Identifying dehydration risk in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy using remote, sensor-based monitoring: A randomized controlled trial.

TitleIdentifying dehydration risk in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy using remote, sensor-based monitoring: A randomized controlled trial.
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsPeterson SK, Shinn EH, Garden AS, Patrick K, Shete S, Shen C, Martch SL, Farcas E, Lin K, Raab F, Nandigam V, Chen T,
Conference NameASCO Annual Meeting Proceedings
Date Published01/2016
PublisherJournal of Clinical Oncology
Abstract

Background: Early identification and mitigation of cancer therapy-induced complications can improve quality of life and reduce complications and health care costs. We are evaluating the efficacy of a system, called CYCORE (CYberinfrastructure for Comparative effectiveness Research), to systematically and accurately collect daily weight, blood pressure, pulse and symptom data from head and neck cancer (HNC) survivors during their 6 to 7-week radiation treatment (RT) regimen using home-based biometric and other sensors integrated with a cyber-physical system. Aims include: 1) evaluate CYCORE’s efficacy in reducing hospitalization and emergency room visits related to dehydration; and, 2) evaluate related impact on costs related to treating dehydration. Methods: Remote, sensor-based monitoring via CYCORE identifies HNC survivors at increased risk for dehydration (i.e., reduced blood pressure and weight, increased pulse, and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) including decreased food and fluid intake). Upon initation of RT, HNC survivors are randomized to either: 1) standard care plus use of the CYCORE system, wherein biometric sensor data and PROs (e.g., pain, nausea, medications, food/fluid intake) are collected ; or, 2) standard care. Outcomes include hospital and emergency room admissions, and related costs. Results: To date, 113 survivors are enrolled (88.9% recruitment and 90.3% retention rates). Those randomized to CYCORE take daily home readings of weight, blood pressure and pulse via Bluetooth-enabled devices, and complete daily PRO assessments on a mobile application. Survivors’ data are available for viewing and clinical decision-making via a Web-based interface by their physicians and other providers. Previously, 59% of HNC survivors on RT showed physiologic signs of dehydration while using the CYCORE system. Worse ratings of nausea and vomiting predicted dehydration risk. Conclusions: CYCORE may serve as one model for integrating mobile and sensor technologies during critical periods of cancer care that occur outside of the clinic setting, and may improve management of treatment side effects, quality of life, and greater satisfaction with care.

URLhttp://meeting.ascopubs.org/cgi/content/abstract/34/3_suppl/152